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Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, William IV, first issue, Isaac Osborne, Grenadier Guards. fought at Waterloo in Lt Col Pack’s Light Company. Officially impressed: “**ISAAC OSBORNE, GRENADIER GUARDS 1837…

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Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, William IV, first issue, Isaac Osborne, Grenadier Guards. fought at Waterloo in Lt Col Pack’s Light Company.

Officially impressed: “**ISAAC OSBORNE, GRENADIER GUARDS 1837**”

Isaac Osborne was born in Ilminster, Somerset, during 1795.

Having worked as a Mason he enlisted for service aged 18 with the Grenadier Regiment of Foot Guards on 13th December 1813.

His service papers record he was in “Belgium 1814, Battle of Waterloo 1815, Siege of Peronne, 1815”

He went to Belgium with the regiment during 1814 and fought at the Battle of Waterloo in the Light Company of the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards under Lt Colonel Pack.

He was lucky to come out of Waterloo unscathed, as a fresh recruit only 20 years old, during the battle his unit, the Grenadier Guards suffered a casualty rate of 46%.

He was discharged from service on 31st March 1837 having served 23 years, with his additional 2 years for Waterloo his total service was 25 years 199 days.

He is on the 1851 Census as a Lodger with the Howe family in Long Sutton, Somerset.

He had no family left so made Long Sutton his home with the Howe family.

His obituary and honorary burial with firing party, Western Gazette 19th December 1879:
LONG SUTTON – DEATH OF A WATERLOO VETERAN.

A pensioner named Isaac Osborne, who served with the Grenadier Guards at the battle of Waterloo, died on Sunday week. Deceased had been living in the parish a great number of years (though he was a native of Ilminster).
The funeral of deceased took place on Sunday afternoon, and at the invitation of the Rev. J. James, vicar, a firing party from the 21st S.R.V. attended.
The following was the order in which the cortege proceeded to church: – Firing Party, carrying their arms reversed; Undertaker; body, borne by friends of deceased; members of the 21st acting as Pall Bearers.

Deceased had no relatives, and the mourners were two pensioners, Sergt Cox and Sergt Crossman, members of the 21st S.R.V.
At the entrance to the church, the body was met by the Rev. J. James and the surpliced choir.
The burial service both in and out of the church was most impressively read by the Rev J. James. Before the body was lain in the grave, the choir sang the hymn, “Soldiers, who are Christ’s below.” When the body was placed on the grave, the usual three volleys were fired. The Rev. J. James and thanks the volunteers for attending and paying tribute of respect to one who had taken part in the Battle of Waterloo, and who, when he was discharged, received a good conduct medal.
There was a very large concourse of people, this being, we believe, the first time a military funeral has taken place here. The bells afterwards rang a half dumb peal.
Deceased was 84 years of age, and had for a long time lodged near the Friends’ Meeting house, with a Mrs Howe. The members of the 21st S.R.V. afterwards partook of refreshments at the Vicarage