About the product

IGS Burma 1885-7 Boy Trumpeter RA

£195.00

India General Service Medal, VR, bar Burma 1885-7, 42020 Trumpeter Albert Hughes, 7 Mountain Battery Northern Division R.A., served as a Boy and Trumpeter, became Sergeant over long career.

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SKU: J7820 Category:
Origin: United Kingdom
Nearly Very Fine

Description

India General Service Medal, VR, bar Burma 1885-7, 42020 Trumpeter Albert Hughes, 7 Mountain Battery Northern Division R.A.,

 

Officially engraved in running script: “42020 Trumpeter A. Hughes No 7 By 1st Bn N.D. R.A.”

 

With copy service records.

 

Edge bruising and contact wear, claw reaffixed, consistent with an extremely long Army Career.

 

A Boy when he signed up with the Artillery at 15 during 1884, he served a full 21 years service, including some years in India as a Trumpeter during the “Burmah” Campaign of 1885-7, at which time he was 16-18 years old.

 

Continuing his service he became a well regarded member of the Royal Artillery, taking numerous courses and rising to Sergeant.

 

He then served throughout the Boer War as Sergeant of 20th Battery R.F.A.

 

Even after 21 years service, he still did not hesitate to sign back up in early September 1914 when war was declared, now over 45 years old. He saw a few months service, as a Sergeant, but was not fit enough to go overseas.

 

He died soon after his medical discharge during May 1916.

 

Newcastle Journal 22nd May 1916:

 

“DRIVER FOUND DEAD ON HIS VAN

 

A Driver named Albert Hughes, of Close Street, Sunderland, employed as a Driver by Messrs Blackett Ltd, Drapers, was on Saturday Night found lying on his van dead. The Vehicle was discovered near the Borough Sanatorium and it is supposed that Hughes must have died suddenly when driving. When discovered he had already been dead some hours.”

 

NEWCASTLE DAILY CHRONICLE, 23RD MAY 1916:

 

“SUDDEN DEATH IN A MOTOR-CAR

 

A verdict in accordance with the medical evidence was returned at an inquest on Albert Hughes, 47 years of age, of 16, Close Street, Sunderland, who died whilst driving his Motor Car on Saturday evening in Hylton Road, Sunderland.

 

From the evidence of a helper who was with Hughes, it appears that the van was travelling up Hylton Road, when Hughes seemed to become unwell.

 

He had got off to deliver a parcel when he saw Hughes fall back in his seat. He ran after the car and jumped into the Driver’s seat and brought it to a standstill. A doctor said that in his opinion death was due to an effusion of blood from a rupture.”

 


Sergeant Albert Hughes, born circa 1868 in Taunton Somerset, first joined the Royal Artillery as a 15 year old on 29th March 1884, with the rank of “Boy”.

 

A year later, he was posted for 5 years service in India, and appointed as a Trumpeter.

 

He saw service in the Burmah Campaign of 1885-7, being a trumpeter throughout until becoming a Driver in 1888.

 

His service:

 

Home, 26th March 1884 – 9th Oct 1885
India, 10th Oct 1885 – 19th Nov 1890, Saw service in Burma earning this medal.
Home, 20th Nov 1890 – 12th Dec 1899
South Africa, 13th Dec 1899 – 3rd July 1902, served through all the Boer War
Home, 4th June 1902 – 1905.

 

For his service in the Boer War, as a Sergeant with 20th Battery Royal Field Artillery, he earned the QSA and KSA, with bars for Cape Colony, Orange Free State and Transvaal.

 

Upon his final discharge from the 130th Battery Royal Field Artillery, Sergeant Hughes was only 37 years old, but had been in the Army for 21 years, since he was 15 years old.

 

There was no way that 10 years later, with the outbreak of WW1, that this old Sergeant would not sign back up.

 

Having been living in Sunderland, he swiftly signed up one last time on 14th September 1914, 45 years old with “Royal Field Artillery 21 years of service.” with service number 32185.

 

The same day he was immediately made a Sergeant, and served in the Royal Artillery until 27th March 1915.

 

Served as Sergeant of the 15th Divisional Artillery then B Battery 70th Brigade from 16th Jan 1915.

 

He only served at Home, earning no medals, being discharged on medical grounds on 27th March 1915.

 

His conduct was said to have been Exemplary, but due to a heart condition he could not prove to be an “effective soldier.”

 

A year later he died on 20th May 1916.