About the product

North West Canada 1885

North West Canada 1885, bar Saskatchewan, Lieut G.W. Stewart, 90th Battalion (Winnipeg RIfles) Canadian Militia. Renowned architect in Canada & United States, wounded in action by a gunshot to the neck…

Out of stock

SKU: J4511 Category:
Origin: United Kingdom
Nearly Extremely Fine

Description

North West Canada 1885, bar Saskatchewan, Lieut G.W. Stewart, 90th Battalion (Winnipeg RIfles) Canadian Militia. Renowned architect in Canada & United States, wounded in action by a gunshot to the neck during the battles of Fish Creek & Batoche.

 

Captain George Stewart, was born on 26th November 1856 in Glasgow, Scotland.
He moved to Guelph, near Toronto, Ontario with his parents at a young age, receiving his early schooling, He later attended Hellmuth college at London Ontario.
After his graduation he served four years apprenticeship in an architect’s office in Toronto, and then opened an office of his own in that City.
He was lured by the Building Boom in Manitoba in 1880 he moved to Winnipeg, becoming a draftsman for Balston C Kenway, Stewart was a talented designer and was credited with an exceptional work located in Emerson Manitoba, a Residence which still stands today, a Grand Mansion created for the Wealthy Owner WIlliam Fairbanks.

 

He was a member of the Canadian Militia, first appointed to the 90th Battalion on 9th November 1883 the day it was formed as 2nd Lieutenant, No 2 Company.
He was Promoted to Lieutenant on 17th October 1884.

 

When the war broke out he went with the 90th Battalion to fight the Indians, he had many exciting experiences in the wars.

 

He was serving with the Unit known to the Indians as the “Little Black Devils” They wore drab green uniforms that looked black in certain lights.

 

He took part in the battles of Fish Creek and Batoche, being shot in the neck and many of his comrades were killed or wounded. Also mentioned in the Architects of Canada as “suffered gunshot wounds in Altercations with Sioux and Blackfoot tribes.”

 

The casualties for the two battles were quite low in Number about 8 men were killed and 46 wounded out of 916 at Batoche, At Fish Creek, 10 men were killed and 40 wounded out of the 900 strength.

 

After the war he was promoted to Captain in 1887 and relinquished his commission.

 

Before leaving Canada his final work was the spectacular Castle-like Riding School & Drill Hall at Regina, Saskatchewan, for the Northwest Mounted Police, the largest indoor Arena in Western Canada in the 19th Century.
It was unfortunately burned to the ground later that year and after he left they built a complete replica from plans built by Stewart, which was later too destroyed by fire in 1920.

 

He then moved to Dallas, Texas in 1887 and continued to Practice there.
Followed by 15 years in Atlanta, before moving in 1911 to St Petersburg, Florida, where he was, a well known member of the Episcopal Church, at one time being a vestryman. He was also a member of the Kiwanis Club, the Yacht Club, the Echo Club, the Art Club, and the Masonic Lodge.
He designed many homes and now historic buildings, including the St Petersburg Yacht Club, the Federal Post Office Building which is not listed d on the National Register of Historic Places.
He retired in 1920, he died age 80 after short illness on 12th march 1937.