About the product

Queen’s South Africa

Queen’s South Africa, 4 bars, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, British War Medal and Bilingual Victory Medal, Corporal G.A.W.F. Gamble, an original member of the C.I.V. and then Provisional Transvaal Constabulary…

Out of stock

SKU: J5840 Category:
Good Very Fine

Description

Queen’s South Africa, 4 bars, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, British War Medal and Bilingual Victory Medal, Corporal G.A.W.F. Gamble, an original member of the C.I.V. and then Provisional Transvaal Constabulary, later 5th S.A.H. during the Great War.

Queen’s South Africa, Officially impressed: “638 Cpl G. Gamble. C.I.V.”
Bilingual Pair off impressed: “Pte G.A.W.F. Gamble. 5th S.A.H.”

When the City of London Imperial Volunteers was formed, Corporal G. Gamble was one of 20 volunteers from the 1st London Royal Engineers to join, they had a large number of Artillery men and many Rifles/Regiment units but their Engineer contingent only consisted of 1 Officer and 19 men from the 1st London Royal Engineers and 8 NCOs and men of the 1st Middlesex Engineers.

George Attoe Windett Fothergill Gamble was born in Islington during 1873, son of Henry and Susan J. Gamble, in a large household of 3 Brothers, 4 Daughters and a Servant, he lived at 4 Western Grove, Western Road, Tottenham, Edmonton, Middlesex.

He also joined alongside Sapper Oscar Hector Cubitt Fothergill Gamble, his younger brother (Born 1875).

He and his brother appeared to have chosen to stay in South Africa following the Boer War, he was working as Police Inspector with the Railways and married Florence Edith Gamble, having a daughter Edith Gamble (Born 20/02/1904).

Then during WW1 he joined the South African Forces, becoming a Private in the 5th South African Horse, at the time he was already well over 40 years old which did not appear to stop him.

His service would possibly lead to his death, on 31st October 1918 aged 45 years old and 10 months, he died at the Lord Milner Hotel, Woodstock, Cape Province, South Africa

His brother Oscar Gamble later died in South Africa during 1964.

Further research into WW1 service could be interesting