About the product

Tibet bar Gyantse 7th Mn Bty RA

£1,595.00

Tibet Medal, bar Gyantse, 7210 Gunner Arthur Lucy, 7th Mountain Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, who took part in the expedition to Gyantse and the capture of Lhasa earning the rare Gyantse clasp.

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SKU: J7791 Category:
Origin: United Kingdom
Nearly Extremely Fine

Description

Tibet Medal, bar Gyantse, 7210 Gunner Arthur Lucy, 7th Mountain Battery, Royal Artillery, who took part in the expedition to Gyantse and the capture of Lhasa earning the rare Gyantse Clasp.

 

Officially engraved in fine running script: “7210 Gunr A. Lucy 7th Mtn By R.G.A.”

 

With copy service records

 

Extract of his services and campaigns:

 

Service: Home, 28th November 1894 – 8th February 1899
India 9th February 1899 – 8th December 1906
This period includes “In Tibet 3rd June 1904, Returned to India 6th August 1904”
Home, 9th December 1906.

 

Campaigns: “Tibet Mission Force 03 + 04”
Medals: “Tibet Mission Force 1903-04 Clasp Gyantse”

 

Arthur Lucy, a Londoner, born in Islington, London, Middlesex, had first signed up for Army Service aged 21 on 28th November 1894.

 

Joining 7 Battery on 9th February 1899 he was posted for overseas service in India.
Appointed as Acting Bombardier on 17th April 1901
Extended his service to complete all 12 years with the Colours, 30th September 1901. (At this point he could have come home instead to finish his 12 years with the reserves)
Promoted to Bombardier on 20th July 1901
But found to be Awaiting Trial being tried and reduced to Gunner on 20th May 1902.

 

Discharged finished his 12 years 13 days of service on 10th December 1906.

 

His Civilian Life:

 

Born in Islington, 1873 into a large family.

 

he was the son of Thomas Lucy, a “Gentleman” according to the Census, who was a Pub Landlord of the Dew Drop Inn in Clifton Rise, no New Cross.

 

As well as running the pub he was also reputed to have been a Bare Knuckle Boxer or “Pugilist” about town.

 

1891 Census, shows a young Arthur working as a Servant to the Gilbert Family, a Coal Dealer and Tea Grover in Dames Road, West Ham, London

 

Once he turned 18 he first joined the Army, enlisting as Private 3668 in the 1st Bn Essex Regiment as Warley on 29th October 1892.

 

After some service he was discharged on 19th April 1894: “On payment of £18 under article 609.”

 

Later that same year he was already back, when he attested for service with the Royal Artillery on 28th November 1894.

 

After his service, he returned to London and died in Whitechapel during early 1925.

 

“The Opening of Tibet, an Account of Lhasa” by Perceval Landon recalls the small artillery detachment present in the column:

 

“Great activity on the enemy’s part was reported, and the small column prepared for a sharp engagement on the 18th.

The composition of the little force may as well be set down here; it consisted of 6 guns of the 7th Mountain Battery (10 Pounders), and 2 Guns of the 30th Mountain Battery (7 Pounders), with the Maxim of the Norfolk Regiment. There were also half a company of the 3d Sappers, and the 1st and 2nd company of the mounted infantry, -200 men in all.”