About the product

Albert Medal

£7,955.00

Albert Medal, Bronze, for Saving Life on Land, Lieutenant Arthur Richard Waddams, Indian Army Reserve of Officers, a Posthumous Award. He was born in Gloucester during 1892, previously a Banker’s…

In stock

Origin: United Kingdom
Extremely Fine

Description

Albert Medal, Bronze, for Saving Life on Land, Lieutenant Arthur Richard Waddams, Indian Army Reserve of Officers, a Posthumous Award.

 

He was born in Gloucester during 1892, previously a Banker’s Clerk before joining the army.

 

His Albert Medal was awarded in the L.G. of 30th August 1918, he died of his fatal wounds on 22nd November 1917 aged 26.

 

“In Mesopotamia, in November last, Lieutenant Waddams was instructing a class in firing rifle grenades.
While a private of the 85th Burmans was under instruction, the rifle missed fire and the detonator of the grenade started working without the grenade leaving the rifle.
Lieutenant Waddams, realising the danger, rushed forward, and, pushing back the soldier, sized his rifle with one hand and the grenade with the other, and tried to throw it over the wall before it exploded in his hand and he received fatal injuries.
The soldier whose life Lieutenant Waddams saved was only slightly injured.”

 

Medal in original embossed case of issue, mint condition.

 

Obituary in the Gloucester Journal 8th December 1917:

 

LIEUT A. R. WADDAMS.
We regret to state that Lieut A.R. Waddams, Indian Army Reserve, the youngest member of a family well known in Ealing, who had been officially reported from the Persian Gulf as very dangerously wounded on Wednesday in last week by a bomb accident, died on the following day at Kurna.

 

Lieut Waddams was 26 years of age. He was educated at the City of London and Latymer Upper Schools. Having received an appointment with the Indian banking firm of Sir H. Seymour King and Co., he went out to Bombay in September 1912.
He had served three years in the 10th Middlesex Territorials, so it was natural that the should join the Bombay Rifles, which he did in 1918, and he was mobilised with this force at the outbreak of war.
In December 1914 he was gazetted to a commission in the Indian Reserve of Officers. In February 1915, he went to Mesopotamia, and in December of that year he was promoted to Lieutenant for ‘Distinguished service in the field’ (Indian Gazette).
Before leaving for India he was active in Church work, and on the occasion establishment of the Church in Wales he acted as treasurer to the organising committee.

 

Among the messages received by Lieut Waddams mother were the following :-

 

General Austin Wires: ‘Exceedingly sorry to hear of Waddams death. Please convey to his mother my deep sympathy in her sad bereavement, and my regret in the Service having lost a most promising young officer.’ – Col. Alexander

 

“Officers and all ranks of Regiment send their heartfelt sympathy at the loss of your son. We have lost the best of comrades – Merwara Infantry.”

 

Lieut Waddams was born at No 2, College Green, Gloucester, in 1891 and was the youngest son of the late Mr Christopher Waddams, hosier and hatter, North-gate, Gloucester.”