About the product

QSA bar Natal Gloucesters POW

£295.00

Queen’s South Africa, 3 bars, Natal, Orange Free State, Transvaal, 4391 Pte H. Dance, Gloucestershire Regiment, taken as a Prisoner of War on 30th October 1899 at Nicholoson’s Nek near Ladysmith.

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SKU: J6927 Category:
Origin: United Kingdom
Very Fine

Description

Queen’s South Africa, 3 bars, Natal, Orange Free State, Transvaal, 4391 Pte H. Dance, Gloucestershire Regiment, taken as a Prisoner of War on 30th October 1899 at Nicholoson’s Nek near Ladysmith.

 

Suspension a little loose, a few edge knocks.

 

Henry Original Dance was born during 1875 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.
He attested for service with the Gloucestershire Regiment aged 19 on 1st October 1894.

 

He would see the following service:

 

Home: 1st Oct 1894 – 29th Oct 1896
Egypt: 30th Oct 1896 – 5th Feb 1897
India 6th Feby 1897 – 23rd Sept 1899
South Africa: 24th Sept 1899 – 16th Nov 1900.
Ceylon: 17th Dec 1900 – 5th Jan 1903
India: 6th Jan 1903 – 8th Dec 1906
Home 9th Dec 1906 – 19th Mar 1907

 

Serving with “C” Company, 1st Battalion The Gloucestershire Regiment during the Boer War, he was taken as a Prisoner at the Battle of Nicholson’s Nek at Ladysmith.

 

An informative summary of the battle by J, Rickard can be read by clicking here, from Historyofwar.org.

 

The battle on 30th October 1899 was disastrous, the British Force of 520 men of the Royal Irish Fusiliers, 450 from the Gloucestershire Regiment and 140 of the No 10 Mountain Battery, were under the command of Lt Col Frank Carleton.

 

The extremely vulnerable British camp situated atop Tchrengula Hill was preyed upon by the Boer Marksmen, the British Commander, Lt Col Carleton had foolishly chosen to remain on the hill for the night of 29th October, instead of retreating with his force back to the safety of Ladysmith, as they were already part of the way to Nicholson’s Nek. By Dawn on the 30th October, the Boers lying in wait atop the hill above the camp, scattered amongst the rocks, the Boers unleashed a deadly fire upon the British, as they were so well hidden and covered, the British could not even attempt to fire back.

 

The battle wound end with at least 38 dead and 105 wounded for the British with a large number taken as Prisoners, meanwhile the Boers would suffer only about 4 riflemen dead and 5 wounded.

 

He would be held as a prisoner for many months, being finally released from the Nooitgedacht Camp on 5th September 1900 at Nooitgedacht, the Camp had been captured by the British on 30th August.